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Other than the presence of the videographer and camera, there is very little difference. The videographer will make sure the principles have microphones on and will announce start end times as being "on the record" and "off the record" but otherwise, the procedures remain the same. While some consideration needs to be made for technical issues - like silencing cell phones - the job of the videographer is to be as unobtrusive as possible. 

Working hand-in-hand, the Court Reporter's Written Transcript and the Legal Cameraman's Video Record provide a complete record of a witness' verbal testimony as well as the subtile clues their demeanor reveals. 

ABOUT DEPOSITIONS

Depositions are essentially legal testimony given outside a courtroom. They are usually take when some circumstances prevent a witness from appearing in court or when an attorney is gaining information for a legal case. The latter is referred to  as a Discovery Deposition.


The testimony given by the witness is legally binding, and for that reason, the witness is sworn in by the Court Reporter or another Officer of the Court to tell the truth to the best of their knowledge.


Usually attorneys and any assistants they require attend the deposition and evidence may be presented in the form of documents or exhibits. A Court Reporter carefully writes down every word said during the deposition, and the transcript serves as the official record of the testimony given.


Traditionally, the Court Reporter served as the sole recorder of the deposition. Recently, depositions are more often a video recording is used to supplement the written transcript since this allows the jury to see the demeanor or attitude of the witness. Sneering looks and winks are not recorded in the transcript, but are readily seen on video.

VIDEO ALLOWS A MORE COMPLETE RECORD OF THE TESTIMONY THAN A WRITTEN TRANSCRIPT ALONE.

HOW DOES VIDEO CHANGE THINGS?